Questions for Arnold Kling(‘s new book)

Arnold Kling recently released a revised version of his most talked-about book: Three Languages of Politics. I think I will buy the revised edition. I think I will buy it because while I’ve read about the model it presents on various blogs, and while that model seems useful to me, I have a number of…

The Liberal Paradox is Neither Liberal nor a Paradox

Academics get a lot of flak for inventing artificial problems. For the most part, I chalk this up to laymen being unfamiliar with what academics do. Imagining things as-yet-unencountered-but-potentially-encounterable is a large part of their job description. Getting at hidden parts of our understanding – for which imagining unrealistic situations is surprisingly useful – is…

Actually, We Like Cooperation Better than You

Life lived as a Libertarian in today’s political order involves a lot of head-scratching. Partly that’s just because you’re an outsider – and anyone who’s outside the mainstream will tend to have a clearer view than others of the mechanisms the mainstream uses to perpetuate itself. For American politics, that means you often notice before…

An Example About Nothing from BHL

Jason Brennan posts a thought on secessionism and freedom (inspired by you-know-what), and it’s yet another case in point about why we should be suspicious of the Bleeding Heart Libertarian project. His basic point is sound, if shallow and unhelpful: In the abstract, secession just means replacing one democratic body with a different one. It’s…

John Quiggen Has Some Homework to Do

I’m frequently amused by how weak attempts to dismiss Libertarianism have become. The latest example I’ve seen showed up yesterday on Crooked Timber. It’s a column by John Quiggin titled What’s Left of Libertarianiam?, and it asserts that "The Libertarian Moment" has already passed because … wait for it … gay marriage is already legal…

How is a Libertarian Like a Conservative?

Arnold Kling has a very interesting post up comparing Progressive political attitudes to being members of an Elect (in the Calvinist sense – but the salient point for Kling is "An elect starts from an assumption of superiority and proceeds from there."). He also speculates on what the conservative and libertarian analogues of this mindset…